News

What's next for the tax bill?

| Read Story

Now that the Republican majority in the Senate has passed its version of a controversial tax bill, a new process begins. And it could be just as complicated and byzantine: melding the two tax bills into one so it can pass both chambers of Congress and go on to President Donald Trump for his signature.

Political Fight Continues Over the GOP's Congressional Tax Plan

| Read Story

Senate Republicans are still looking for the necessary votes to pass their $1.5 trillion tax cut legislation. Lawmakers, however, have a short amount of time to pass the bill before the end of the legislative session. We speak with Professor Steven Smith of Washington University about what's in the tax plan and what maneuvering will need to happen to see it pass or fail.

Interview with Exec in Residence Dick Mahoney

| Read Story

Richard J. Mahoney is featured in the current issue of Leaders, a quarterly that “represents a forum of ideas and opinions on the major issues of change, and that distinguishes the special provinces of the world’s leaders.”

While President Trump Calls For Regulatory Cuts, The Cost Of Regulating Increases

| Read Story

President Trump has made reducing regulatory burdens a top priority, and his early actions— including disapproval of 14 recent Obama-administration regulations and his directive requiring two regulations to be eliminated for every new one issued—suggest he is serious.

7 Questions about the Senate health care bill and transparency

| Read Story

Here are seven questions and answers about how the current Senate bill is being put together, and how its predecessor bill, the Affordable Care Act, was assembled in 2009 and 2010.

Majority of Americans feel 'forgotten' by government

| Read Story

Do you think the government in Washington generally represents your interests, or has the government forgotten about “people like you?” That was the new question we asked in our latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll. Despite greater confidence about their economic futures, a whopping three-quarters of our respondents feel overlooked by Washington.

Senator has a point, but 'filibuster' count misses mark

| Read Story

Republicans changed Senate rules to break a Democratic filibuster and confirm Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court, and blamed Democrats for necessitating the change along the way.

US-China Relations and the Nuclear Option in the Senate to Confirm Neil Gorsuch

| Read Story

Mitch Jeserich speaks with Steven S. Smith, professor of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis about the change in senatorial rules that has allowed Neil Gorsuch to be confirmed to the Supreme Court.

Snags slow Trump's White House debut

| Read Story

US President Donald Trump speaks during the Friends of Ireland Luncheon for the visit of Taoiseach of Ireland Enda Kenny at the US Capitol March 16, 2017

Poll finds most and least popular parts of ACA

| Read Story

As House Republicans labor to define a new plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, often called “Obamacare,” public support for the 2010 legislation is at an all-time high, according to a national survey taken in January.

The Consumer Confidence Gap Between Democrats and Republicans Has Never Been Wider

| Read Story

When it comes to confidence in the U.S. economy, the partisan divide is the widest ever on record. Democrats are expecting an outright recession, whereas Republicans are expecting the exact opposite–and getting ready to let the boom times roll.

Why the Fight Over Neil Gorsuch Could End the Senate as We Know It

| Read Story

Senate Republicans have begun hinting that they’ll use the “nuclear option,” a maneuver to change Senate rules by brute force, to stop the Democratic minority from blocking the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch.