Faculty Research, Support, & Books

Faculty Research Grants

The Weidenbaum Center supports social science by funding research projects conducted by faculty at Washington University. The Center's primary clients are faculty in the Departments of Economics, Political Science, and Sociology. The highest priority are projects that are collaborative, address frontier social scientific research problems, and will lead to external funding. 

The Center works closely with faculty to acquire external funding for their research. Most federal and private foundation grants in economics, political science, and sociology are submitted through the Center and grant awards are administered by the Center staff.

 

FY20 Small Grant Deadlines

Fall 2019 Small Grant Application Deadline: September 23, 2019 

Spring 2020 Small Grant Application Deadline: February 8, 2020

BROWSE FACULTY RESEARCH GRANT ARCHIVE

Faculty Workshops

The Center sponsors a wide variety of research workshops in the Departments of Economics, Political Science, and Sociology that bring in scholars from across the world to discuss and collaborate on research problems. For more information on our Frontiers of Social Science Program and links to a listing of Departmental Research Workshops, please go to link below.

Frontiers of Social Sciences

Grant Administration

Weidenbaum Center staff work with the faculty in the Departments of Economics, Political Science, and Sociology to identify sources of external funding and to prepare and submit applications for external funding. Center staff assist with the preparation of proposals to private foundations and government programs, including the National Science Foundation and National Institute of Health. 

Grant awards are administered by the Center. The Center staff provides accounting, verification, and reporting services for faculty projects in coordination with the Univeristy's Office of Sponsored Research Services. 

For more information, pleae contact the Center staff.

 

 

 

 

 

NSF (General) Grant Deadlines 

Political Science (PD 19-118Y - Security and Preparedness (SAP)): January 15/August 17, 2020 (August 15 thereafer)

Political Science (PD 19-120Y - Accountable Institutions and Behavior (AIB)): January 15/August 17, 2020 (August 15 thereafer)

Sociology (PD 98-1331): January 15/August 17, 2020 (August 15 thereafter)

Economics (PD 98-1320): January 21, 2020 (January 18 thereafter/August 18

To note: We would appreciate knowing 6 weeks prior to the imposed NSF deadline if you plan on submitting a grant, and starting to receive your budgetary materials a month prior to the deadline. 

For more information on NSF proposal submission requirements please consult: NSF PAPPG Guide 

Sponsored Faculty Research Publications

2019: 

Jacob Montgomery (with Brendan Nyhan). “The Effects of Congressional Staff Networks in the House of Representatives.” Journal of Politics, forthcoming. 

Paulo Natenzo “Random Choice and Learning.” Journal of Political Economy, forthcoming.

Andrew Reeves (with T. Park). “Local Unemployment and Voting for President: Uncovering Causal Mechanisms,” Political Behavior, forthcoming. 

Andrew Reeves (with Ryan T. Moore). “Defining Racial and Ethnic Context with Geolocation Data,” Political Science Research and Methods, forthcoming.

Guillermo Rosas (with A. Lucardi). “Jumping Ship or Jumping on the Bandwagon? When Do Local Politicians Support National Candidates,” Political Science Research and Methods, forthcoming.

Norman Schofield. “Spatial Social Choice.” The Oxford Handbook of Public Choice, edited by Stefan Voigt, Bernard Grofman, and Roger Congleton (Oxford University Press), forthcoming.

Norman Schofield. Coalitions and Veto Players,” The Oxford Handbook of Behavioral Politics, edited by Alex Mitz and Lesley Terris (Oxford University Press), forthcoming.

Betsy Sinclair (with Steven S. Smith and Patrick D. Tucker). “It’s largely a rigged system: Voter Confidence and the Winner Effect in 2016,” Political Research Quarterly, forthcoming. 

Betsy Sinclair (with Joshua Boston, Jonathan Homola, Michelle Torres, and Patrick D. Tucker). “The Dynamic Relationship between Personality Stability and Political Attitudes,” Public Opinion Quarterly, forthcoming. 

Betsy Sinclair (with Michelle Torres, Jonathan Homola, Joshua Boston, and Patrick D. Tucker). “Casualties of the Culture Wars: Lifestyle Differences Between Democrats and Republicans,” forthcoming.

Margit Tavits (with Efrén O. Pérez). N.d. “Language Heightens the Political Salience of Ethnic Divisions,” Journal of Experimental Political Science, forthcoming.

Margit Tavits (with Dino Hadzic). 2019. “The Gendered Effects of Violence on Political Engagement.” Journal of Politics, forthcoming.

Margit Tavits (with Efrén O. Pérez). 2019. “Language Influences Public Attitudes toward Gender Equality.” Journal of Politics 81(1): forthcoming.

Ping Wang (with Danyang Xie). “Housing Dynamics: Theory Behind Empirics,” forthcoming.

Adia Harvey Wingfield. Flatlining: Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2019, forthcoming.

Adia Harvey Wingfield. Views from the Other Side: Black Professionals’ Perceptions of Diversity Management.” In Race, Work, and Leadership in the 21st Century, eds Laura Morgan Roberts and David Thomas. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business Publishing, 2019, forthcoming.

2018: 

Venus Bivar. 2018. “Kuznets, Dr. Frankenstein, and the GNP Monster,” presented at the American Society for Environmental History, Annual Meeting, Riverside, CA.

Paulo Natenzo (with Leandro Gorno). 2018. “Subjective Ambiguity and Preference for Flexibility.” Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 154:24–32. 

Andrew Reeves (with J.C. Rogowski). 2018. “The Public Cost of Unilateral Action.” American Journal of Political Science 62(2): 424-440.

Ariela Schacter (with René Flores). 2018. “Who are the ‘Illegals’?: The Social Construction of Illegality in the U.S.” American Sociological Review 83(5): 839-868.

Betsy Sinclair with Thad Hall. 2018. Politics for a Connected Public. Oxford University Press. 

Betsy Sinclair with Steven S. Smith and Patrick D. Tucker. 2018. “The Fragile Trump Coalition.” In The Principles and Practice of American Politics, eds. Samuel Kernell and Steven S. Smith, 7th ed. CQ Press.

Margit Tavits (with Petra Schleiter). 2018. “Voter Reactions to Incumbent Opportunism.” Journal of Politics 80(4): 1183-1196.

Margit Tavits (with Jonathan Homola). 2018. “Contact Reduces Immigration-Related Fears for Leftist but Not for Rightist Voters,” Comparative Political Studies 51(13): 1789-1820.

View full list of sponsored research

the faculty bookshelf

Flatlining: Race, Work and Health Care in the New Economy
The American Congress - 10th edition
The Oxford Handbook of Public Choice
A Connected America
Principles and Practice of American Politics: Classic and Contemporary Readings 7th edition
Politics Over Process
The Senate Syndrome: The Evolution of Procedural Warfare in the Modern U.S. Senate
After the Great Recession: The Struggle For Economic Recovery And Growth
The Competition of Ideas
Curbing Bailouts
Reforming the Presidential Nomination Process
The American Congress Reader
Party Influence in Congress
One-armed Economist
Business and Government in the Global Marketplace, 7th Edition
The Politics of Institutional Choice The Formation of the Russian State Duma
Bamboo Network: How Expatriate Chinese Entrepreneurs Are Creating a New Economic Superpower in Asia
Small Wars, Big Defense: Paying for the Military After the Cold War A Twentieth Century Fund Book
Rendezvous with Reality: The American Economy After Reagan

Flatlining: Race, Work and Health Care in the New Economy

What happens to black health care professionals in the new economy, where work is insecure and organizational resources are scarce? In Flatlining, Adia Harvey Wingfield exposes how hospitals, clinics, and other institutions participate in “racial outsourcing,” relying heavily on black doctors, nurses, technicians, and physician assistants to do “equity work”—extra labor that makes organizations and their services more accessible to communities of color. Wingfield argues that as these organizations become more profit driven, they come to depend on black health care professionals to perform equity work to serve increasingly diverse constituencies. Yet black workers often do this labor without recognition, compensation, or support. Operating at the intersection of work, race, gender, and class, Wingfield makes plain the challenges that black employees must overcome and reveals the complicated issues of inequality in today’s workplaces and communities.

The American Congress - 10th edition

The tenth edition of this respected textbook provides a fresh perspective and a crisp introduction to congressional politics. Informed by the authors’ Capitol Hill experience and scholarship, the new edition reflects changes in Congress resulting from the 2018 elections and such developments as (a) a new majority party in the House; (b) new campaign spending numbers and election outcomes, rules, committees, leaders, and budget developments; and (c) recent political science literature that provides new perspectives on the institution. The text emphasizes the recent developments and includes important learning aids, including lists of key term, discussion questions and suggested further reading. Alongside clear explanations of congressional rules and the lawmaking process there are examples from contemporary events and debates that highlight Congress as a group of politicians as well as a lawmaking body.

The Oxford Handbook of Public Choice

The Oxford Handbook of Public Choice provides a comprehensive overview of the research in economics, political science, law, and sociology that has generated considerable insight into the politics of democratic and authoritarian systems as well as the influence of different institutional frameworks on incentives and outcomes. The result is an improved understanding of public policy, public finance, industrial organization, and macroeconomics as the combination of political and economic analysis shed light on how various interests compete both within a given rules of the games and, at times, to change the rules. These volumes include analytical surveys, syntheses, and general overviews of the many subfields of public choice focusing on interesting, important, and at times contentious issues. Throughout the focus is on enhancing understanding how political and economic systems act and interact, and how they might be improved.

A Connected America

A Connected America: Politics in the Era of Social Media examines how voters interact with political representatives, the media, and other voters online. Offering a broad and current overview that doesn't skimp on the details, this text focuses on how new media affects policy changes, legislation, and elections-especially in the wake of the unprecedented 2016 U.S. presidential campaign cycle, the multiple special elections, and sweeping policy shifts. Cutting across a variety of course areas and topics, A Connected America is a perfect complement to courses on campaigns and elections, public opinion, and political media.

Principles and Practice of American Politics: Classic and Contemporary Readings 7th edition

Combining timeless readings with cutting-edge articles and essays, Principles and Practice of American Politics, Seventh Edition,enriches students’ understanding of the American political system by examining the strategic behavior of key players in U.S. politics. This collection of classic and contemporary readings brings concepts to life by providing students with real examples of how political actors are influenced by the strategies of others and are governed by the Constitution, the law, and institutional rules. Carefully edited by award-winning authors Samuel Kernell and Steven S. Smith, each reading is put into context to help students understand how political actions fall within a major national political forum.

Politics Over Process

Although the U.S. Constitution requires that the House of Representatives and the Senate pass legislation in identical form before it can be sent to the president for final approval, the process of resolving differences between the chambers has received surprisingly little scholarly attention. Hong Min Park, Steven S. Smith, and Ryan J. Vander Wielen document the dramatic changes in intercameral resolution that have occurred over recent decades, and examine the various considerations made by the chambers when determining the manner in which the House and Senate pursue conciliation. Politics Over Process demonstrates that partisan competition, increasing party polarization, and institutional reforms have encouraged the majority party to more creatively restructure post-passage processes, often avoiding the traditional standing committee and conference processes altogether.

The Senate Syndrome: The Evolution of Procedural Warfare in the Modern U.S. Senate

With its rock-bottom approval ratings, acrimonious partisan battles, and apparent inability to do its legislative business, the U.S. Senate might easily be deemed unworthy of attention, if not downright irrelevant. This book tells us that would be a mistake. Because the Senate has become the place where the policy-making process most frequently stalls, any effective resolution to our polarized politics demands a clear understanding of how the formerly august legislative body once worked and how it came to the present crisis. Steven S. Smith provides that understanding in The Senate Syndrome.

Like the Senate itself, Smith’s account is grounded in history. Countering a cacophony of inexpert opinion and a widespread misunderstanding of political and legislative history, the book fills in a world of missing information—about debates among senators concerning fundamental democratic processes and the workings of institutional rules, procedures, and norms. And Smith does so in a clear and engaging manner. He puts the present problems of the Senate—the “Senate syndrome,” as he calls them—into historical context by explaining how particular ideas and procedures were first framed and how they transformed with the times. Along the way he debunks a number of myths about the Senate, many perpetuated by senators themselves, and makes some pointed observations about the media’s coverage of Congress.

The Senate Syndrome goes beyond explaining such seeming technicalities as the difference between regular filibusters and post-cloture filibusters, the importance of chair rulings, the changing role of the parliamentarian, and the debate over whether appeals of points of order should be subject to cloture margins, to show why understanding them matters. At stake is resolution of the Senate syndrome, and the critical underlying struggle between majority rule and minority rights in American policy making.

After the Great Recession: The Struggle For Economic Recovery And Growth

The severity of the Great Recession and the subsequent stagnation caught many economists by surprise. But a group of Keynesian scholars warned for some years that strong forces were leading the U.S. toward a deep, persistent downturn. This book collects essays about these events from prominent macroeconomists who developed a perspective that predicted the broad outline and many specific aspects of the crisis. From this point of view, the recovery of employment and revival of strong growth requires more than short-term monetary easing and temporary fiscal stimulus. Economists and policy makers need to explore how the process of demand formation failed after 2007, and where demand will come from going forward. Successive chapters address the sources and dynamics of demand, the distribution and growth of wages, the structure of finance, and challenges from globalization, and inform recommendations for monetary and fiscal policies to achieve a more efficient and equitable society.

The Competition of Ideas

Murray Weidenbaum has been a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a speaker at meetings at the Brookings Institution, the Cato Institute, and the Heritage Foundation and has also written for their publications, and served as a reviewer of ongoing studies. In The Competition of Ideas, Weidenbaum examines the political economy of these vital institutions, drawing heavily on several decades of involvement in their activities. He is uniquely able to see their accomplishments as well as their shortcomings.

Because of the importance of the activities of their organizations, and their tax-exempt status, think tanks are held to a high standard. Weidenbaum shows that sometimes think tanks are more tank than think—major think tanks are often predictable in the positions they take on public issues and are far better at analyzing the shortcomings of other elements of society than of their own operations. The overarching issue of quality control, Weidenbaum holds, deserves more attention than it has attained in the think tank world.

This book presents a careful, balanced account of where think tanks have been and where they are now headed. Given the high levels of professionalism in many think tanks, a fundamental change in the attitude of their management is important. The compelling need is less for the wielder of policy than for the lucid synthesizer of relevant research and analysis. Likewise, society needs sensitivity to the long-term concerns of the citizenry more urgently than rapid response to the opportunities of the moment. Future competition, particularly among the major think tanks, could well be centered, not on achieving greater visibility, but on developing responses to economic, environmental, and national security problems that are likely to be adopted and carried out.

Curbing Bailouts

Banking crises threaten the stability and growth of economies around the world. In response, politicians restore banks to solvency by redistributing losses from bank shareholders and depositors to taxpayers, and the burden the citizenry must bear varies from case to case. Whereas some governments stay close to the prescriptions espoused by Sir Walter Bagehot in the nineteenth century that limit the costs shouldered by taxpayers, others engage in generous bank bailouts at great cost to society. What factors determine a government's response?

In this comparative analysis of late-twentieth-century banking crises, Guillermo Rosas identifies political regime type as the determining factor. During a crisis, powerful financial players demand protection of their assets. Rosas maintains that in authoritarian regimes, government officials have little to shield them from such demands and little incentive for rebuffing them, while in democratic regimes, elected officials must weigh these demands against the interests of the voters—that is, the taxpayers. As a result, compared with authoritarian regimes, democratic regimes show a lower propensity toward dramatic, costly bailouts.

Reforming the Presidential Nomination Process

The 2008 U.S. presidential campaign has provided a lifetime's worth of surprises. Once again, however, the nomination process highlighted the importance of organization, political prowess, timing, and money. And once again, it raised many hackles. The Democratic contest in particular generated many complaints—for example, it started too early, it was too long, and Super Tuesday was overloaded. This timely book synthesizes new analysis by premier political scientists into a cohesive look at the presidential nomination process—the ways in which it is broken and how it might be fixed.

The contributors to Reforming the Presidential Nomination Process address different facets of the selection process, starting with a brief history of how we got to this point. They analyze the importance—and perceived unfairness—of the earliest primaries and discuss what led to record turnouts in 2008. What roles do media coverage and public endorsements play? William Mayer explains the "superdelegate" phenomenon and the controversy surrounding it; James Gibson and Melanie Springer evaluate public perceptions of the current process as well as possible reforms. Larry Sabato (A More Perfect Constitution) calls for a new nomination system, installed via constitutional amendment, while Tom Mann of Brookings opines on calls for reform that arose in 2008 and Daniel Lowenstein examines the process by which reforms may be adopted—or blocked.

The American Congress Reader

The American Congress Reader provides a supplement to the popular and newly updated American Congress undergraduate textbook. By the same authors who drew upon Capitol Hill experience and nationally recognized scholarship to present a crisp introduction and analysis of Congress's inner mechanics, the Reader compiles the best relevant scholarship on party and committee systems, leadership, voting, and floor activity to broaden and illuminate the key features of the text.

Party Influence in Congress

Party Influence in Congress challenges current arguments and evidence about the influence of parties in the U.S. Congress. Political scientists differ in their evaluations of the influence of congressional parties over policy outcomes. Steven S. Smith reviews the arguments and finds them deficient in many respects. In their place, he offers an enriched, more nuanced view of the way parties influence the behavior of legislators and shape legislative outcomes.

One-armed Economist

One-Armed Economist represents a personal, if eclectic, approach to public policy. Weidenbaum avoids doctrinaire positions, be they Keynesian or monetarist or supply side or libertarian. This distillation of Weidenbaum's wide range of writings on public policy issues over the last four decades draws on his practical experience in government and business as well as his academic research over that extended period.

The volume covers six major clusters of policy issues: economic policy, government programs, business decision-making, government regulation, the defense sector, and the international economy. There are chapters on how to achieve a cleaner environment, how to fundamentally overhaul the tax and health care systems, and a defense of Reaganomics. The work examines how public sector activities impact the performance of the national economy. Its coverage includes the role of government as a buyer, a seller, a provider of credit, and a source of subsidy and support. Drawing heavily on his experience as economist for a major military contractor, Weidenbaum shows that the defense industry is the most heavily regulated sector of the American economy and discusses ways to modernize the arcane and wasteful process of procuring weapon systems.

He also draws on his work on the hidden costs of regulation on the consumer, showing how to improve the regulatory process so as to achieve national objectives while minimizing the burdens of compliance. The last section is devoted to the international economy, with chapters on the role of the overseas enterprises. One-Armed Economist is a lucid analysis of major public policy issues of our time. As such it will be of special interest to organizations involved in public policy, think tanks, and government policymaking groups, as well as readers interested in fresh perspectives on a broad range of policy issues.

Business and Government in the Global Marketplace, 7th Edition

This book addresses the intricate relationship between the public and the private sector, covering why and how government intervenes in the economy and how business can respond. It provides analysis from both perspectives, presenting the ways that government policy affects the activities of the modern corporation and the key responses on the part of business.

The Politics of Institutional Choice The Formation of the Russian State Duma

Events in Russia since the late 1980s have created a rare opportunity to watch the birth of democratic institutions close at hand. Here Steven Smith and Thomas Remington provide the first intensive, theoretically grounded examination of the early development of the State Duma, the lower house of the Russian Federation's parliament created by the 1993 constitution. They offer an integrated account of the choices made by the newly elected members of the Duma in establishing basic operating arrangements: an agenda-setting governing body, a standing committee system, an electoral law, and a party system. Not only do these decisions promise to have lasting consequences for the post-communist Russian regime, but they also enable the authors to test assumptions about politicians' goals from the standpoint of institutional theory.

Smith and Remington challenge in particular the notion, derived from American contexts, that politicians pursue a single, overarching goal in the creation of institutions. They argue that politicians have multiple political goals--career, policy, and partisan--that drive their choices. Among Duma members, the authors detect many cross currents of interests, generated by the mixed electoral system, which combines both single-member districts and proportional representation, and by sharp policy divisions and an emerging party system. Elected officials may shift from concentrating on one goal to emphasizing another, but political contexts can help determine their behavior. This book brings a fresh perspective to numerous theories by incorporating first-hand accounts of major institutional choices and placing developments in their actual context.

Bamboo Network: How Expatriate Chinese Entrepreneurs Are Creating a New Economic Superpower in Asia

Describes how expatriate Chinese entrepreneurs are building business empires in Southeast Asia.

Small Wars, Big Defense: Paying for the Military After the Cold War A Twentieth Century Fund Book

One of the most difficult issues facing the United States government is how to maintain an adequate defense in a period of budget stringency. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait made it clear that the United States must be able to respond to rapid changes in the international scene. On the other hand, with the extraordinary events in Eastern Europe, reductions in US-Soviet tensions, and a worsening budget deficit at home, it is equally obvious that the military budget will be squeezed substantially in the early 1990s. The issue of defense spending is at the forefront of the US political agenda, and with it a host of fundamental questions: How much military strength does the US really need in a post-Cold War world? How can economic policy handle large cuts in defense? And what is to be done with the people and companies now working on defense projects? In Small Wars, Big Defense, Murray Weidenbaum, the former Chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisors, draws on years of government and industrial experience to offer a provocative look at the troubled US military complex as it confronts a radically changing world. After a careful assessment of present and likely future threats to US security interests, he takes a hard look at the the American military and defense industry, demonstrating how cycles of "feast and famine" in military budgeting have been so wasteful. He calls for a fundamental reform of the spending process, including an overhaul of the procurement system, more sensible ways of paying military personnel, and reductions in regulation of the defense contractors. At the same time, he offers concrete policies on how the American economy can best adjust to large defense cutbacks and move toward a more civilian-oriented economy. Finally, he presents ideas for getting the most out of lower defense budgets, while maintaining the capability to reverse course if necessary.

Rendezvous with Reality: The American Economy After Reagan

A former economic advisor to President Reagan offers a blueprint for dealing with America's economic malaise, with specific emphasis on cutting spending and improving competitiveness and the tax system.